Commit a32d69dc authored by Archan MISRA's avatar Archan MISRA

modified wrong citation

parent 729b49e3
......@@ -26,7 +26,7 @@ We now describe the design of our RF energy harvesting based wearable device, wh
\subsection{The RF Energy Harvester}
The RF harvester works by converting the received wireless transmissions into an output voltage. However, the output voltage usually fluctuates significantly with slight movement in the wearable device. As a result, the instantaneous power of the harvester is not strong and stable enough to operate the wearable directly. We use a boost converter BQ25570\am{what is this}, which has been commonly used in prior energy harvesting applications. This converter converts input voltage as low as 100mV to a programmable output voltage. (In our implementation, we set the output voltage at 2.57V) This output voltage is then used to operate an entire embedded system including 1 microcontroller, 1 inertial sensor and 1 RF communication front end.
In our current effort, we do not focus on the development of the ``best harvester"--instead, our goal is to demonstrate the viability of the overall \name framework. Accordingly, we implement the harvester (illustratedin Figure~\ref{fig:harvester}) on a commonplace prototype PCB (FR4 material). The harvester includes a ``impedance matching network", followed by a rectifier. Moreover, we hand-tune the inductor (approximately 1 round of wire) until the resonant voltage is highest on the WiFi 802.11b channel 1 (the channel used by the WiFi AP for transmitting ``power packets" in our study). In more product-grade implementations, the harvester would need to have multiple such inductors (to allow energy harvesting across dynamically varying AP channels), and would also need to implement dynamic impedance matching (e.g.,~\cite{Felini:2014}).
In our current effort, we do not focus on the development of the ``best harvester"--instead, our goal is to demonstrate the viability of the overall \name framework. Accordingly, we implement the harvester (illustratedin Figure~\ref{fig:harvester}) on a commonplace prototype PCB (FR4 material). The harvester includes a ``impedance matching network", followed by a rectifier. Moreover, we hand-tune the inductor (approximately 1 round of wire) until the resonant voltage is highest on the WiFi 802.11b channel 1 (the channel used by the WiFi AP for transmitting ``power packets" in our study). In more product-grade implementations, the harvester would need to have multiple such inductors (to allow energy harvesting across dynamically varying AP channels), and would also need to implement dynamic impedance matching (e.g.,~\cite{felini2014}).
\begin{figure}[!h]
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